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Dire conditions in Gaza take toll on newborn babies

Dire conditions in Gaza take toll on newborn babies The dire conditions in Gaza have taken a toll on the most vulnerable members of society - newborn babies. The ongoing conflict and blockade have led to a shortage of essential medical supplies, lack of proper healthcare facilities, and high rates of unemployment and poverty, all contributing to the worsening health outcomes for newborns. According to reports from Save the Children, the infant mortality rate in Gaza has risen significantly in recent years. In 2015, the rate was 20.3 deaths per 1,000 live births, compared to 17.2 deaths in 2010. This increase in infant mortality is a clear indication of the deteriorating health conditions and lack of access to proper healthcare in the region. The shortage of essential medical supplies is a major contributing factor to the dire situation in Gaza. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 40% of essential medicines and 30% of medical disposables are unavailable in Gaza's hospitals. This scarcity of essential supplies means that newborn babies are not receiving the necessary medications and treatments they need to survive and thrive. The lack of proper healthcare facilities is another major issue facing newborn babies in Gaza. The ongoing conflict has destroyed many hospitals and healthcare centers, leaving the region with limited capacity to provide adequate care. Families are often forced to travel long distances to access healthcare, which can be especially challenging for pregnant women and newborns in critical condition. The high rates of unemployment and poverty in Gaza also contribute to the dire conditions faced by newborn babies. According to the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the unemployment rate in Gaza is over 50%, one of the highest in the world. This means that families are struggling to afford basic necessities, including healthcare and nutritious food for their newborns. The dire conditions in Gaza not only impact the physical health of newborn babies but also their mental well-being. The constant exposure to violence and insecurity has a traumatic effect on infants and can have long-lasting consequences on their development. The lack of a safe and stable environment hampers the emotional and cognitive development of newborns, putting them at a disadvantage from the very beginning of their lives. Efforts have been made by various humanitarian organizations to address the dire conditions faced by newborn babies in Gaza. Non-profit organizations like Save the Children and UNICEF are working to provide essential medical supplies and healthcare services to newborns and their families. They also offer support and counseling to help mitigate the mental health impact on infants. However, the situation remains challenging, and more needs to be done to improve the health outcomes for newborns in Gaza. The international community needs to put pressure on authorities to lift the blockade and ensure the free flow of essential supplies and humanitarian aid. Investment in healthcare infrastructure and the creation of job opportunities can also help alleviate the dire conditions and provide a brighter future for newborns in Gaza. The dire conditions in Gaza have taken a devastating toll on newborn babies. The shortage of essential medical supplies, lack of proper healthcare facilities, high rates of unemployment and poverty, and exposure to violence and insecurity all contribute to the worsening health outcomes for newborns in the region. While efforts are being made by humanitarian organizations, there is an urgent need for the international community to take action and address the dire conditions faced by newborn babies in Gaza.

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