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Saudi Arabia lacks community and political dignity to be a global football hub

Saudi Arabia lacks community and political dignity to be a global football hub Saudi Arabia has been making significant investments in football and aims to become a global football hub. However, the kingdom's football ambitions face a significant hurdle: the lack of community and political dignity that is essential for the growth of the sport. Recently, Saudi Arabia hosted the Spanish Super Cup, which showcased the country's ambitions to attract top-level football events. The tournament featured some of Europe's biggest clubs, including Barcelona and Real Madrid. However, despite the high-profile event, there are deeper issues that need to be addressed for Saudi Arabia to truly establish itself as a football hub. Football is more than just hosting tournaments and attracting star players. It is about cultivating a strong grassroots culture and community participation. In Europe and the US, football is deeply ingrained in the culture, with young children playing the sport in local leagues and communities fostering a love for the game. This grassroots foundation is what ultimately fuels the success of football in those regions. In Saudi Arabia, football lacks such a foundation. The country's football culture is still in its infancy, with limited participation at the grassroots level. Football is predominantly seen as a spectator sport, rather than a sport for everyone to play and enjoy. This lack of community participation hinders the development of talented young players and limits the overall growth of the sport. Another major challenge for Saudi Arabia's football ambitions is the political conditions of the country. The kingdom has a controversial track record when it comes to human rights, particularly in relation to women's rights. It is difficult to imagine Saudi Arabia being seen as a global football hub when there are ongoing human rights concerns. Football, as a global sport, has a responsibility to promote inclusivity and equality. This is a core value that underlies the success of football in Europe and the US. Saudi Arabia's political conditions, including its treatment of women and restrictions on freedom of expression, go against these values. If Saudi Arabia wants to be taken seriously as a global football hub, it needs to address these political concerns head-on. This means taking substantial steps towards improving human rights and creating an environment where all members of society can participate in and enjoy the sport. Only then can Saudi Arabia hope to attract top-level football events and establish itself as a true footballing nation. Furthermore, for Saudi Arabia to become a global football hub, it needs to invest in its domestic leagues and players. While the kingdom has made significant investments in foreign clubs and players, it has neglected its own domestic talent. Developing a strong domestic league and nurturing local players is crucial for the long-term success of Saudi Arabian football. By investing in grassroots football and developing local talent, Saudi Arabia can create a sustainable football culture that will attract international recognition. This requires long-term planning and commitment from both the government and football authorities in the country. Additionally, Saudi Arabia needs to foster a culture of transparency and fair play in its football industry. The recent takeover of Newcastle United by a Saudi Arabian consortium raised concerns about the potential influence of foreign ownership on the integrity of the sport. To be seen as a global football hub, Saudi Arabia must demonstrate a commitment to fair play and ensure that the sport is free from external interference. In conclusion, Saudi Arabia's aspirations to become a global football hub are hindered by the lack of community and political dignity necessary for the growth of the sport. The kingdom needs to invest in grassroots football and develop a strong domestic league to nurture local talent. Additionally, it needs to address its human rights concerns and foster a culture of transparency and fair play. Only then can Saudi Arabia hope to establish itself as a true footballing nation and attract top-level football events.

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